Jean Kabre and The Transformation of His Home Village in Burkina Faso, Africa : ニュース写真

Jean Kabre and The Transformation of His Home Village in Burkina Faso, Africa

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
キャプション:
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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作成日:
2012年11月13日(火)
報道写真番号:
157046976
制限:
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フォトグラファー:
The Washington Post / 寄稿者
コレクション:
The Washington Post
クレジット:
The Washington Post/Getty Images
最大ファイルサイズ:
5,500 x 3,667 px (69.85 x 46.57 cm) - 200 dpi - 12.4MB
リリース情報:
リリースされていません。詳細情報
ソース:
The Washington Post
オブジェクト名:
ME-VILLAGE

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Jean Kabre R talks with coworkers Justine Osborne L and Daniel Ezoua... ニュース写真 157046976アメリカ,コンシェルジュ,システム手帳,ヒューマンインタレスト,ワシントンDC,仕事仲間,働く,出来事,横長,話すPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2012 The Washington PostWASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)