Mes Aynak Archeological Site : ニュース写真

Mes Aynak Archeological Site

クレジット: 
Jerome Starkey / 寄稿者
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] An Afghan labourer surveys the Mes Aynak archeological dig, on the site of an ancient Buddhist settlement, from outside his hilltop tent, November 14, 2011. More than 250 of his colleagues are working with a team of international experts to excavate a series of monasteries and homes, on the site of a massive copper deposit, before it is destroyed by an open cast mine. The team, lead by the Délégation Archéologique Française en Afghanistan (DAFA), has already unearthed a series of four monasteries stocked with murals and statues, thought to date from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. The monasteries and adjoining settlements, in the Hindu Kush mountains, 35km south of Kabul, may have been first used by humans up to 5000 years ago. The copper deposit, which is one of the largest in the world, was effectively sold by the Afghan government to a Chinese state mining company, the China Metallurgucal Group Corporation (MCC) in 2007, amid allegations of ministerial level corruption. The MCC paid $3billion for the rights to mine, and promised to build a railway to get the metal out of landlocked Afghanistan.
キャプション:
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] An Afghan labourer surveys the Mes Aynak archeological dig, on the site of an ancient Buddhist settlement, from outside his hilltop tent, November 14, 2011. More than 250 of his colleagues are working with a team of international experts to excavate a series of monasteries and homes, on the site of a massive copper deposit, before it is destroyed by an open cast mine. The team, lead by the Délégation Archéologique Française en Afghanistan (DAFA), has already unearthed a series of four monasteries stocked with murals and statues, thought to date from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. The monasteries and adjoining settlements, in the Hindu Kush mountains, 35km south of Kabul, may have been first used by humans up to 5000 years ago. The copper deposit, which is one of the largest in the world, was effectively sold by the Afghan government to a Chinese state mining company, the China Metallurgucal Group Corporation (MCC) in 2007, amid allegations of ministerial level corruption. The MCC paid $3billion for the rights to mine, and promised to build a railway to get the metal out of landlocked Afghanistan.
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作成日:
2013年01月04日(金)
報道写真番号:
159142548
制限:
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コレクション:
Moment
最大ファイルサイズ:
3,543 x 2,362 px (124.99 x 83.33 cm) - 72 dpi - 2.23MB
リリース情報:
リリースされていません。詳細情報
ソース:
Moment Editorial
オブジェクト名:
6349165673.jpg

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An Afghan labourer surveys the Mes Aynak archeological dig on the... ニュース写真 159142548Settlement,Site,アフガニスタン,アフガン,丘,仏教,大昔の,掘る,横長,科学技術,考古学Photographer Collection: Moment ©Jerome Starkey[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] An Afghan labourer surveys the Mes Aynak archeological dig, on the site of an ancient Buddhist settlement, from outside his hilltop tent, November 14, 2011. More than 250 of his colleagues are working with a team of international experts to excavate a series of monasteries and homes, on the site of a massive copper deposit, before it is destroyed by an open cast mine. The team, lead by the Délégation Archéologique Française en Afghanistan (DAFA), has already unearthed a series of four monasteries stocked with murals and statues, thought to date from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. The monasteries and adjoining settlements, in the Hindu Kush mountains, 35km south of Kabul, may have been first used by humans up to 5000 years ago. The copper deposit, which is one of the largest in the world, was effectively sold by the Afghan government to a Chinese state mining company, the China Metallurgucal Group Corporation (MCC) in 2007, amid allegations of ministerial level corruption. The MCC paid $3billion for the rights to mine, and promised to build a railway to get the metal out of landlocked Afghanistan.